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COLOMBIA YOMINSON TRUJILLO

$19.00

Expect fruit tones ranging from melon and pear to citrus and stone fruit, while remaining very caramel-forward and sweet. As it cools, flavors of crisp sencha and dates rise to the surface.

ROAST: Light
PRODUCER: Yominson Trujillo
REGION: Tarqui, Huila
PROCESS: Fully Washed
VARIETY: Variedad Colombia

Clear

COLOMBIA YOMINSON TRUJILLO

$19.00

Expect fruit tones ranging from melon and pear to citrus and stone fruit, while remaining very caramel-forward and sweet. As it cools, flavors of crisp sencha and dates rise to the surface.

ROAST: Light
PRODUCER: Yominson Trujillo
REGION: Tarqui, Huila
PROCESS: Fully Washed
VARIETY: Variedad Colombia

Clear

COFFEE INFO

Yominson Trujillo has worked with coffee since he was 8 years old alongside his mother. While many children in rural Colombia grow up helping their parents on their farm, Yominson began managing his own plot of trees from this early age. He decided to continue working in coffee out of respect for culture and his tradition, and by the age of 17 Yominson had purchased his own plot of land on the neighboring mountain face. The lot we purchased from Yominson comes from his farm, Villa Milet, which he inherited from his mother, Nora Milet. It is here that Yominson picked his first coffee cherries, and he decided to name the farm in honor of his mother.

You can find Villa Milet about 2 hours outside of the village of Tarqui in an area referred to by locals as La Profunda (the depths). Not long ago coffee production in this area was nearly impossible. According to Yominson, the extreme weather conditions harmed coffee trees, leading to consistently low yields each year. If this wasn’t enough, parasites carried by migratory birds would fall onto coffee trees during migration and harm the trees, sometimes killing them. At several points Yominson considered giving up and leaving coffee producing behind. Sadly, this story is not unfamiliar to us. Many coffee farmers have considered, or are actively giving up on coffee because it is so difficult to produce.

Though times were difficult, Yominson persisted and continued cultivating coffee. What’s truly interesting is that now, decades after Yominson first began farming, climate has significantly shifted in Colombia, and the result has been a shift in the viability of coffee growing areas. His farm is now more productive than ever, which is a major blessing considering the existential threat climate change poses for many coffee farmers. At 1900 meters above sea level, which is quite high compared to many farms, the dreaded roya or coffee leaf rust disease which kills entire harvests of coffee is virtually a non issue at Villa Milet. In a matter of decades, this area went from barely cultivatable to extremely fertile. With all the right conditions, Yominson has managed to produce coffees of outstanding quality, and has become recognized as one of the leaders of coffee production in his area.

Because of this, Yominson has managed to sell his coffee into the international specialty coffee market twice, once to a buyer in the US and once to Australia. As mentioned previously, there are countless hurdles for coffee farmers to overcome in order to enter the international market. Though things are not easy even if they do manage to sell their coffee. Because of the remoteness of coffee farms and the lack of infrastructure, many farmers rely on neighbors or seemingly odd connections to move their coffees or to connect them to international buyers. These connections can be unstable at best, and nefarious at worst. Yominson recognized the instability and sought to find a way to sell his coffee. Luckily, Yominson now works with the Monkaaba Project which not only helps him sell his coffee but also helps him gain insight into how his coffee tastes and how he can produce the best tasting coffees consistently from year to year.

PARTNERSHIP

Semilla Coffee works, at least in some capacities, as a coffee importing service. Traditionally, coffee importing services buy large quantities of coffee and sell them to roasters. There’s this kind of blueprint, or outline of how coffee importers work, and a lot of it has to do with following international market trends and not connecting directly with the farmers themselves. This enables the exploitation of coffee producers by intermediaries. Since no one is directly connecting with buyers, there’s no responsibility for who is actually receiving the bulk of the value for coffees, with farmers usually receiving very little of the value.

While importing or trading companies as they’re sometimes called can still function in this way, a lot of trading companies are becoming more responsible and transparent about their actions and how they source coffees. We’re lucky enough to be working with a couple really awesome companies that are breaking away from traditional systems of trading coffee, kind of like how Monkaaba is breaking away from traditional systems of selling coffee into markets. Whereas in the past importing companies mainly just worked to sell coffees to roasters, most of the importers we work with today function as a resource for getting us—Utopian Coffee—closer to the farm level than we could ever get by ourselves during this crazy season of life.

Semilla is one of those companies that are approaching everything differently. Instead of shooting to purchase coffees at low differentials from many different countries and producing-groups, Semilla focuses on creating long-term partnerships with individuals who, truly, they’d call friends. Brendan Adams, the founder of Semilla, can tell you that he has a personal friendship with Esnaider and that they’ve discussed how to genuinely help farmers out in the long run. To Semilla it isn’t about the money to be made by trading coffee, it’s about connecting like-minded people together and creating a network of mutual support and advocacy. Instead of purchasing just the top lots, or the best coffees available, Semilla creates partnerships that revolve around trust and friendship, not a “quality score.”

We’ve been connected to the Monkaaba Project by Brendan at Semilla, and we are truly excited to share with you a coffee that encapsulates what we believe makes Colombian coffee truly special.

Yominson Trujillo